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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

5 edition of Wittgenstein and religious belief found in the catalog.

Wittgenstein and religious belief

W. D. Hudson

Wittgenstein and religious belief

by W. D. Hudson

  • 62 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by St. Martin"s Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 1889-1951,
  • Faith

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementW. Donald Hudson.
    SeriesNew studies in the philosophy of religion
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB3376.W564 H84 1975b
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 206 p. ;
    Number of Pages206
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5193486M
    LC Control Number75014714

    Religious experiences can be characterized generally as experiences that seem to the person having them to be of some objective reality and to have some religious import. That reality can be an individual, a state of affairs, a fact, or even an absence, depending on the religious tradition the experience is a part of. A wide variety of kinds of. An exciting introduction to the contribution which the later Wittgenstein made to the philosophy of religion. Although his writings on the subject have been few, Wittgenstein developed influential and controversial theories on both religion (and magic) which emphasize the distinctive nature of religious discourse and how this nature can be misunderstood when viewed in direct competition with.

    LC Lectures and Conversations on Aesthetics, Psychology and Religious Belief LFM Wittgenstein's Lectures on the Foundations of Mathematics, Cambridge , ed. Cora Diamond. LSD ‘The Language of Sense Data and Private Experience’.   An exciting introduction to the contribution which the later Wittgenstein made to the philosophy of religion. Although his writings on the subject have been few, Wittgenstein developed influential and controversial theories on both religion (and magic) which emphasize the distinctive nature of religious discourse and how this nature can be misunderstood when viewed in direct competition Cited by:

    Wittgenstein's interest in the empirical study of religion can serve to switch our attention beyond the almost obsessive focus on religious belief and language that has been such a marked feature of contemporary philosophy of religion, and focus instead on the . religious belief and practices. Such is the case notwithstanding Witt- the question of whether Wittgenstein was 'a religious person' is even more Gospel in Brief which he had purchased in a small book shop. Often his fellow soldiers called him, not by his proper name but with the byword - "the one with the Gospels." The religious.


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Wittgenstein and religious belief by W. D. Hudson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Kierkegaard believed religious belief to stand at an ‘infinite distance’ from philosophical clarity. He did not believe that such clarity could by itself bring anyone one whit closer to religious faith.” (Pg.

) This book will be very helpful for anyone interested in Wittgenstein’s thoughts on religion and related issues/5(5). The lectures on aesthetics were delivered in private rooms in Cambridge in the summer of The lectures on religious belief belong to a course on belief given about the same time.

The conversations on Freud between Wittgenstein and Rush Rhees took place between and ” He asks, “How did we learn ‘I dreamt so and so’?5/5(2). This article is based on three assumptions. The first is that Ludwig Wittgenstein's impact in the philosophy of religion has been more a function of the work of those inspired by him than of his own writings on this topic.

The second is that Wittgensteinian philosophers of religion took their primary inspiration from Wittgenstein's later approach to philosophy in general, as manifest in the Cited by: 2.

Wittgenstein and religious belief. [W D Hudson] Book\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0 library:oclcnum\/a> \" \/span>\" ; \u00A0\u00A0 Verifiactionism and religious belief -- Wittgenstein and the logical positivist critique of religion -- Transcendence -- Faith and falsiability -- Eschatology -- Religious statements of fact -- Lectures on.

Wittgenstein And Religious Belief book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5. Wittgenstein and Interlocutor (I). A trait of Wittgenstein’s writing’s is the inclusion of an interlocutor (in the Blue and Brown Books and the Philosophical Investigations for instance), with which to discourse philosophically on a given subject.

Hence, his Lectures on Religious Belief (), parts I-III are no what follows, are some notes on lecture I that are placed within. Interesting insights from Wittgenstein on aesthetics, Freud, and religious belief, but in all honesty it wasn't as great as P.I, TP, or OC.

I would stick to his main publications, only /5. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hudson, W.D. (William Donald).

Wittgenstein and religious belief. London: Macmillan, (OCoLC) L. Wittgenstein, "Lectures on Religious Beliefs", in Lectures and Conversations on Aesthetics, Psychology and Religious Belief as compiled from notes taken by Yorick Smythies, Rush Rhees, and James Taylor and edited by Cyril Barrett, (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, ), pp.

53 - In the preface the editor, Cyril Barrett, says that "Besides the. Wittgenstein's opening remark is double-barreled: he states that the field of aesthetics is both very big and entirely misunderstood.

By “very big”, I believe he means both that the aesthetic dimension weaves itself through all of philosophy in the manner suggested above, and that the reach of the aesthetic in human affairs is very much. Wittgenstein on God and Belief.

25 Friday Jan It strikes me that a religious belief could only be something like a passionate commitment to a system of reference. Hence, although it’s belief, it’s really a way of living, or a way of assessing life. Two quotes to supplement Wittgenstein’s interpretation of religious.

In a book of personal recollections of Wittgenstein by Pascal and others close to him, one of Wittgenstein’s literary executors, the philosopher Rush Rhees, interprets “cowardly beyond measure.

assess Wittgenstein’s belief that language games allow religious statements to have meaning. [35 marks] The term “religious language” refers to statements or claims made about God or gods, the debate over the meaning of religious language is one that is very controversial.

One philosopher to join this debate and present a theory on religious language was Wittgenstein. Cif belief Religion Saul Kripke famously developed this line of inquiry with his book Wittgenstein on Rules and going on pilgrimage – are the background against which religious claims.

Book Description. Wittgenstein was one of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century. In this collection, distinguished Wittgenstein scholars examine his legacy for the philosophy of religion by examining key areas of his work: Wittgenstein's Tractatus; Frazer's 'Golden Bough'; and the implications of his later philosophy for the understanding of religion.

Lectures and Conversations on Aesthetics, Psychology and Religious Belief. Author: Ludwig Wittgenstein; Publisher: Univ of California Press ISBN: Category: Philosophy Page: 72 View: DOWNLOAD NOW» In Wittgenstein delivered a short course of lectures on aesthetics to a small group of students at Cambridge.

There has been a resurgence of interest in Wittgenstein's early philosophy of religion with Lazenby's book being one of several recent contributions to the field. It is a short monograph of less than pages, excluding the index, and is based upon the author's doctoral dissertation.

Wittgenstein made a number of interesting, if rather cryptic, comments about religious belief in these books, and did seem to suggest that such atheist criticisms miss their mark.

What follows is a brief guide to the leading ‘Wittgensteinian’ defences of religious belief, rooted in Wittgenstein’s later : Stephen Law. Wittgenstein's own faith was austere, or, to use his word, "ascetic", that is, without ritual or doctrine, with religious stories (Religious faith is not belief that an hypothesis is true; our relationship to a religious proposition is quite different) serving only as life-guiding pictures.

Wittgenstein’s ‘defense’ of religion I really enjoyed philosopher Stephen Law’s book Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked into an Intellectual Black Hole where he takes apart many common beliefs, including religious ones, and provides tips about how to deal with the slipperiness of the many arguments put forward by believers.

A language-game (German: Sprachspiel) is a philosophical concept developed by Ludwig Wittgenstein, referring to simple examples of language use and the actions into which the language is nstein argued that a word or even a sentence has meaning only as a result of the “rule” of the “game” being played.

Depending on the context, for example, the utterance “Water!” could. This slender volume contains notes, kept by some of those who were present, of lectures on aesthetics and religious belief, and of conversations with Rush Rhees concerning Freud. The lectures were given informally by Wittgenstein at Cambridge in ; the Cited by: Wittgenstein denounces those who purport to have air-tight proofs that can justify religion (which thinkers like Leibniz considered essential), just as he disagrees with those, like Russell, who think that, given the lack of such proofs, any kind of religious belief must be completely : Patrick Ducray.